FAQ

  1. What is dentistry?

 

Dentistry is the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of conditions, disorders, and diseases of the teeth, gums, mouth, and jaw. Often considered necessary for complete oral health, dentistry can have an impact on the health of your entire body.

 

  1. What is a dentist?

 

A dentist is a specialist who works to diagnose, treat, and prevent oral health problems. Your dentist has completed at least eight years of schooling, and received either a DDS (Doctor of Dental Surgery) degree, or a DMD (Doctor of Dental Medicine) degree. If your doctor is a pediatric dentist, this means that he or she specializes in caring for children from infancy through their teen years. A pediatric dentist has received the proper education and training needed to work with young kids. Other specializations include:

  • Endodontics (root canals)
  • Oral and maxillofacial (including pathology, radiology, and surgery)
  • Orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics
  • Periodontics (gum disease)
  • Prosthodontics (implants)
  1. Where is clinic located?

 

It is located in sector G-11/3, Main Ibne Sina Road, Islamabad. (Attach the link of sector map here)

 

  1. What are the clinic timings?

 

For summer and winter our timing are same. We are open six (6) days in a week except Sunday. You can book an appointment and visit us between 09:00am to 08:00pm and Break timings are 01:00 to 04:00

 

  1. Can we just walk in to get checkup?

 

No, Pre-appointment is compulsory except in case of emergency

 

  1. Who will treat us?

 

We have qualified dedicated (Female/Male) doctors who are certified from PMDC

 

 

 

  1. Do I need to arrive early for my first appointment?

 

Yes. Please arrive 05-10 minutes early to fill patient registration and history form

 

  1. How long will my first appointment last?

 

It varies, but almost it’s a 15 minute appointments on the first visit.(Consultation only).

 

  1. What is a root canal?

 

Millions of teeth are treated and saved each year with root canal, or endodontic, treatment. A root canal is a treatment to repair and save a badly damaged or infected tooth. The procedure involves removing the damaged area of the tooth (the pulp), cleaning and disinfecting it and then filling and sealing it. The common causes affecting the pulp are a cracked tooth, a deep cavity, repeated dental treatment to the tooth or trauma. The term “root canal” comes from cleaning of the canals inside the tooth’s root.

 

  1. Dental Sterilization / Infection Control


We are one of the few new practices in Ireland that have built a dedicated sterilization room to ensure the highest standard of patient safety in accordance with future guidelines and the best practice in the UK.

 

This involves a flow of instruments through a process of cleaning sterilization. All of our staff continuously updates their training to ensure best practice for patient safety. Your safety is our top priority and we would be delighted to show any patients our safety procedures on a practice tour.

 

One of the main contamination sources can be water. In our filtering process, 99.9% pure water is created through a self-contained water system, this is then used in all patient applications for safety.

 

All instruments connected to the water system that touch patients are heat-sterilized after each use in a process called autoclaving. These items are routinely checked and dated to ensure optimum safety and items that are not able to be heat-sterilized are deemed to be single use and disposed of. A new item is then used for each new patient.

 

  1. How many times a day should I brush my teeth?

 

You should brush after each meal. The best way to be sure you are caring for your teeth properly is to discuss your homecare techniques and needs with your dentist or hygienist.

 

 

 

  1. Why should I go to the dentist regularly?

 

  • Many people do not see a dentist on a regular basis.
  • They only go when they have a problem. This is known as “crisis treatment”.
  • Patients may feel they are saving money; it often ends up costing much more in money and time.

 

Symptoms until they reach the advanced stages of the disease process. An example is tooth decay. It is typical to hear, “Nothing hurts… I don’t have any problems.” Preventive treatment other type of people who visit dentist regularly their problems are identifies earlier before it hurts this type of treatment is called preventive treatment this is easier on pocket and time too.

 

 

 

  1. Why should I floss, isn’t brushing enough?

Flossing reduces the remaining food particle and plough from the mouth. Bacteria live in plaque which can be removed by flossing and Brushing.

 

Brushing your teeth gets rid of some of the Plough of your mouth. Flossing gets rid of the plough and food particles the toothbrush can’t get to.

 

Flossing remove the plough hiding in the tiny spaces between your teeth. If you do not floss, you allow plaque to remain between your teeth. Eventually it hardens into tartar.

 

Plaque can be removed by brushing and flossing but tartar can only be removed by chair side appointment with dentist.

 

  1. What can I do about sensitive teeth?

 

Sensitivity toothpaste, which contains strontium chloride or potassium nitrate are very effective in treating sensitive teeth. After a few weeks of use, you may notice a decrease in sensitivity. Highly acidic foods such as oranges, grapefruits and lemons, as well as tea and soda can increase tooth sensitivity, and work against sensitivity toothpaste. If you do not get relief by brushing gently and using desensitizing toothpaste, see your dentist. There are special compounds that can be applied in-office to the roots of your tooth to reduce – if not eliminate – the sensitivity. High-fluoride containing home care products can also be recommended to help reduce tooth sensitivity.

 

  1. Bad teeth hereditary

 

  • Teeth are inherited but the bad habits of previous generations do not have to be. A good oral hygiene regimen can prevent cavities and gum disease. Teeth alignment is what usually is inherited due to discrepancies in tooth shape, size and jaw size. For example, large teeth in a small jaw can lead to crowding of the teeth. Small teeth in a large jaw can lead to spacing. Spacing between the two front teeth is called a diastema which is an inherited trait. Eating Habits during development of the teeth can also affect the health of teeth. Not having enough calcium in the diet during teeth development may cause the teeth to be weaker and predispose it to cavities. Having fluoride in the diet during teeth development has also shown to strengthen teeth and resist cavity formation.

 

  • Like many other aspects of our health, there is a genetic component to teeth from the way they look to their overall health — not all teeth are created equal. With that said, it is very important to take care of your teeth and gums in order to try to prevent any dental disease. Brushing, flossing, a healthy diet, and regular dental visits are a path to a healthy mouth. Remember, a healthy lifestyle will show up throughout your entire body!

 

  • Bad teeth can be used to describe several teeth with lots of decay or it can be used to describe teeth that are crooked or misaligned. Crooked teeth are usually passed down from generation to generation due to genetics. However, bad teeth that described teeth with lots of decay is usually from bad habits. Examples of bad habits are not brushing and flossing twice a day or eating lots of candy or drinking lots of sodas.

I think many people think that tooth decay has a genetic component because some families have more cavities than other families. Remember, tooth decay has a bacterial component to it. So, if you are kissing your family members or sharing drinks or food with them, you are passing along the bacteria that causes tooth decay. So if one member of your family is not taking care of their teeth well, it can cause the rest of the family to be at risk for tooth decay. That’s why decay can run in families.

 

  1. Why are my gums bleeding?

 

Gums bleed when they are irritated and inflamed which is not considered normal. This is due to plaque (a soft film of bacteria) being left on the teeth which causes inflammation called gingivitis and if not addressed can develop into gum disease. Over time, if not cleaned off through daily brushing and interdental cleaning, the plaque can turn into a hard deposit called tartar or calculus which will require professional scaling by your dentist or hygienist to remove it.

 

It is important even if your gums bleed they are still brushed to keep the mouth clean otherwise the bacteria build up in the mouth will make gum inflammation worse. After a few days of thorough cleaning, your gums should stop bleeding. If this does not happen you will need to ask the advice of your dental team as you may need professional cleaning.

A good oral care regime should be able to prevent your gums from bleeding if done correctly. We would always suggest that you have regular examinations at your dentist. This can help diagnose and treat anything unusual in your mouth so you get the correct care and advice.

 

You may have to use a softer brush whilst the gums are inflamed until they become healthier. It is also important to clean in between teeth daily using interdental brushes or floss. Smoking can cover up a gum problem as it restricts the blood flow to the mouth. If you have recently given up smoking this could allow the gums to get a better circulation and therefore start to bleed.

 

  1. What should I look for when choosing the right dentist for me?

 

Choosing a dentist who “clicks” with you and your family is important, and you may wish to consider several dentists before making your final decision. During your first visit, you should be able to determine whether the dentist is right for you. During your appointment, consider the following:

 

  • Is the appointment schedule convenient?
  • Is the office easy to get to and close by?
  • Does the office appear to be clean and orderly?
  • Was your medical and dental history recorded and placed in a permanent file?
  • Does the dentist explain techniques for good oral health?
  • Is information about cost presented to you before treatment is scheduled?
  • Is your dentist a member of the ADA (American Dental Association)?

 

  1. How common is gum disease?

 

It is the most common dental problem, and it can progress quite painlessly until you have a serious problem. The end result is bone loss and the loss of teeth. Even though you may brush and floss regularly, regular visits to the dentist will help detect gum disease in the early stages.

 

  1. How i can contact with your doctors

 

Many patients find it’s difficult to get their doctors to return a phone call or email. It’s even difficult to get doctors to supply an email address, to begin with. But there may be ways to encourage your doctor to communicate with you by return phone call or email.

 

  1. What type of toothbrush and toothpaste should I use?

 

Buy toothbrushes with soft bristles. Medium and firm ones can damage teeth and gums. Use soft pressure, for 2 minutes, two times a day. Both powered and manual toothbrushes clean teeth well. Manual brushes with mixed bristle heights or angled bristles clean better than those with all flat, even bristles. Powered toothbrushes may be easier if you have trouble using your hands.

 

Set a reminder to replace your toothbrush every 3-4 months. Toss it sooner if the bristles look bent or splayed out. Bent bristles don’t clean as well. (They’re also a sign you may be brushing too hard.)

 

Most toothpaste will clear away bacteria growth and acids from food and drinks. Toothpastes with the American Dental Association (ADA) Seal of Acceptance always have fluoride, which strengthens and protects teeth. If you want a non-fluoride option, stores carry toothpastes and powders made with natural ingredients that don’t have ADA testing and approval. If cold or hot food or drinks make you cringe, pick a toothpaste for sensitive teeth and let your dentist know.

 

  1. How can I get my kids to brush their teeth?

 

Make it fun! Children do what they see not what they are told If you are enthusiastic about brushing your teeth, your children will also be enthusiastic. Children want to do the things their parents do. If your children see you brushing your teeth and displaying good dental habits, they will follow.

 

Introduce some creative activities like some applications or some incentives to your kid for brushing properly. All children should be seen by their first birthday or 6 months after the eruption of the first tooth.

 

  1. How can I prevent cavities?

 

1-proper brushing that is two to three minutes of brushing and flossing daily can reduce the risk of cavity no hard brushing.

 

2- Control sugar intake (Candy, crackers, chips, sweets are the source of sugar).

 

3-Avoid sticky food like raisins, chips and peanut butter (etc). These food stick to your teeth. They can provide a constant supply for the bacteria eating into your teeth.

 

4- Time tour sugar intake with your meal.

5- Rains your mouth with clean water after every meal.

 

6- Do not forget your regular dental visits. Good dental habits will go a long way toward a no-cavity visit.

 

  1. Why does the dentist take X-rays?

 

Many diseases of the teeth and surrounding tissues cannot be seen when the dentist examines the mouth. An X-ray examination may reveal:

 

  • small areas of decay between the teeth or below existing restorations (fillings)
  • infections in the bone
  • periodontal (gum) disease
  • abscesses or cysts
  • developmental abnormalities
  • some types of tumors

 

  1. What is fluoride and why is it important to dental health?

 

1-Fluoride is a mineral that occurs naturally in many foods and in water. Some natural sources of fluoride are brewed tea, canned fish, cooked kale and spinach, apples, and skim milk.

 

2-Some country water fluoridated by the government, so by drinking tap water you will acquire fluoride

 

3- People who drink non-fluoridated can be prescribed with supplement and topical application.

 

4-Fluoride is important to dental health because it helps prevent tooth decay by making your tooth enamel more resistant to acid attacks from plaque bacteria in your mouth.

 

  1. What are cavity-fighting sealants?

 

Sealants are a thin coating painted on chewing surfaces of molars and premolars. Dental sealants act as a barrier, protecting your teeth against decay-causing bacteria.

 

  1. What can I do about sensitive teeth?

 

Sensitivity is caused by gingival inflammation, bone lose, enamel weakness. Above mention causes can only be evaluated and treated in office except for enamel weakening which can be treated with anti sensitive  toothpaste, which contains strontium chloride or potassium nitrate are very effective in treating sensitive teeth. After a few weeks of use, you may notice a decrease in sensitivity.

Highly acidic foods such as oranges, grapefruits and lemons, as well as tea and soda can increase tooth sensitivity, and work against sensitivity toothpaste. If you do not get relief by brushing gently and using desensitizing toothpaste, see your dentist immediately.

 

  1. What is periodontal disease?

Periodontal disease is inflammation and infection of the gums and supporting bone structure, which if left untreated, can cause permanent jaw bone destruction and possible tooth loss. Untreated periodontal disease has been linked to increased risk for conditions such as heart disease, stroke, low birth weight babies, pre-term delivery, respiratory disease, and prostate cancer. An advanced stage of periodontal disease exhibits inflamed gums pulling away from your bone and teeth. Other signs of periodontal disease include:

  • Bad breath.
  • Red or swollen gums.
  • Loose teeth or teeth that have moved.
  • Sensitive teeth.
  • Pus coming from around the teeth.
  • Pain when chewing.
  • Tender gums.
  • Bleeding gums.

 

Treatment of early periodontal disease can be performed in-office. However, advanced stages may require surgery. Periodontal disease can be prevented and treated successfully by seeing your dentist and dental hygienist regularly and following recommended care plans.

 

  1. How long will the results of teeth whitening last?

 

It varies depending upon if you smoke, drink red wine or coffee, or consume other acid-containing foods, your bright smile may begin to yellow more quickly than you expect.

 

In general, a teeth whitening procedure can last up to a few years. And even though the results can fade, occasional touch-ups can be done to regain luster. It may depend on your case as an individual which can only be evaluated in office when you visit the dentist.

 

  1. Do whitening toothpastes work?

 

Commercial whitening toothpastes vary greatly in their ability to whiten teeth. They work by removing surface stains from the teeth with the use of mild abrasives slow and regular application of this toothpaste can even harm the protective surface of the tooth.

 

However, unlike professional whitening, some whitening toothpastes do not alter the intrinsic color of the teeth.

 

Toothpastes that are effective in removing stains can also destroy tooth enamel in the process. These toothpastes use harsh abrasives. With repeated use, harsh abrasives begin to damage tooth enamel and can contribute to increased tooth sensitivity. If you would like to try a whitening toothpaste, consult with your dentist first.

 

  1. Is smokeless tobacco harmful?

 

Smokeless tobacco may be smokeless, but it isn’t harmless. These are some of the potential hazards:

 

  • A sore that does not heal
  • A lump or white patch
  • A prolonged sore throat
  • Difficulty in chewing
  • Restricted movement of the tongue or jaw
  • A feeling of something in the throat

 

Pain is rarely an early symptom. All tobacco users need to see their dentist regularly.

 

  1. What should I do about bleeding gums?

 

People often respond to bleeding gums with the wrong method of treatment. Usually, gums that bleed are a symptom of the onset of periodontal disease or gingivitis. But often, people stop brushing as frequently and effectively because it may be painful or it may cause the gums to bleed again. However, when gums are inflamed, brushing could help reduce the inflammation. More importantly, you should see your dentist to have a periodontal screening and recording performed in order to determine the level of disease present and the best treatment course to pursue. It is also worth noting that chronic dental pain and discomfort are obvious signs of a problem. Over-the-counter drugs may provide some temporary relief. These medications usually only mask the existence of a problem and should be taken on a temporary basis. It is important to see your dentist as soon as possible if your gums begin to bleed.

 

  1. Why do my teeth darken?

 

Many factors work to destroy the naturally white smile you were born with. Tobacco, certain foods, and certain drinks actually stain teeth. These substances continually work on our teeth causing our white smile to gradually fade.

 

Hot coffee and tea are especially hazardous to your smile because they change the temperature of teeth. This temperature change – hot and cold cycling – causes the teeth to expand and contract allowing stains to penetrate the teeth. Cutting down on coffee and tea can go a long way to creating a great smile. Foods that are slightly acidic are also dangerous to your white smile. These foods open up the pores of the tooth enamel allowing stains to move more easily into the tooth. Your dentist can help you with more tips on keeping a white smile.

 

 

  1. Why should I use a mouth guard?

 

A mouth guard can prevent injuries to your face and teeth. Most people benefit from wearing a mouth guard when playing any sport. You should wear one whether you are playing professionally or just on weekends. Do what you can to preserve your smile and your health.

 

The best mouth guards are custom-fitted by your dentist. This is especially important if you wear braces or fixed bridgework. Commercial, ready-made mouth guards can be purchased at most sporting goods stores. They are relatively inexpensive but they are also less effective. In either case, rinse your mouth guard with water or mouthwash after each use. With proper care, it should last for several months.Ask your dentist which kind of mouth guard you should use.

 

  1. I have diabetes. Why is my dentist concerned?

Research today suggests a link between gum disease and diabetes. Research has established that people with diabetes are more prone to gum disease. If blood glucose levels are poorly controlled you may be more likely to develop gum disease and could potentially lose teeth. Like all infections, gum disease can be a factor in causing blood sugar levels to rise and make diabetes harder to control.

 

Be sure to see your dentist regularly for check-ups and follow home care recommendations. If you notice other conditions such as dry mouth or bleeding gums, be sure to talk with your dentist. And don’t forget to mention any changes in medications.

 

 

 

  1. Why do I have to take antibiotics before my dental appointment?

 

There are certain conditions that require pre-medication with an antibiotic prior to dental treatment to prevent adverse effects and infection that can be caused by bacteria that enter the blood stream during certain treatment. You will want to consult with your dentist about this prior to treatment.

 

  1. I have dentures. Is it necessary for me to still see my dentist?

 

Visits to the dentist include more than just “checking teeth.” While patients who wear dentures no longer have to worry about dental decay, they may have concerns with ill fitting appliances or mouth sores to name a few. Annual visits to the dentist (or sooner if soreness is present) is recommended.

 

During these visits, an oral cancer screening and head and neck exam will be performed as well as an evaluation of the fit or need for replacement of the existing appliances. Regular visits can help you to avoid more complicated problems down the road.

 

  1. Are electric toothbrushes better than manual brushes?

 

If a manual toothbrush is used for the appropriate amount of time, and done with proper technique, it can perform just as well as a powered toothbrush.

 

But many people don’t brush for the recommended two to three minutes. Children are also good candidates for powered brushes as their brushing habits tend to be less than optimal. While everyone certainly does not need an electric toothbrush, in many instances they can be beneficial. Ask your dentist if you have any questions about which brush is best for you.

 

  1. What should I do if I require pre-medication?

 

Please be sure to request a prescription prior to your appointment, or if you are unsure, contact us and we can help.

 

  1. What causes morning breath?

 

When you are asleep, production in your mouth decreases. Since your saliva is the mouth’s natural mouthwash, most people experience morning breath. Bacteria found on teeth in the crevices and on the taste buds of the tongue, break down the food particles, which produce sulfur compounds.

 

It is actually these sulfur compounds which give our breath a bad odor. During desk, your saliva helps to wash away bacteria and food particles. Your saliva also helps to dissolve the foul smelling sulfur compounds.

 

Chronic, long-term mouth odor can be a sign of more serious illness. See your dentist if this is a concern.

  1. I just found out I am pregnant. How can this affect my mouth?

 

About half of women who are pregnant experience a condition called pregnancy gingivitis. This condition can be uncomfortable and cause swelling, bleeding, redness or tenderness in the gum tissue.

 

A more advanced oral health condition called periodontal disease (a serious gum infection that destroys attachment fibers and supporting bone that hold teeth in the mouth) may affect the health of your baby. Studies have shown a relationship between periodontal disease and preterm, low birth-weight babies. In fact, pregnant women with periodontal disease may be seven times more likely to have a baby that’s born too early and too small.

 

The likely culprit is a labor-inducing chemical found in oral bacteria called prostaglandin. Very high levels of prostaglandin are found in women with severe cases of periodontal disease.

 

  1. Why do I have to take antibiotics before my dental appointment?

 

There are certain conditions that require pre-medication with an antibiotic prior to dental treatment to prevent adverse effects and infection that can be caused by bacteria that enter the blood stream during certain treatment. You will want to consult with your dentist about this prior to treatment.

 

  1. I have dentures. Is it necessary for me to still see my dentist?

 

Visits to the dentist include more than just “checking teeth.” While patients who wear dentures no longer have to worry about dental decay, they may have concerns with ill fitting appliances or mouth sores to name a few. Annual visits to the dentist (or sooner if soreness is present) is recommended.

 

During these visits, an oral cancer screening and head and neck exam will be performed as well as an evaluation of the fit or need for replacement of the existing appliances. Regular visits can help you to avoid more complicated problems down the road.

 

  1. How do I schedule my next checkup?

 

Simply call our practice! Our front desk staff will be happy to help schedule your next dental checkup at your convenience. If you are a new patient, please let us know and we will provide you with all the information you need for your first dental visit.

 

  1. If I have braces, do I still need dental checkups every six months?

 

Yes! In fact, it’s even more important that patients receiving orthodontic treatment visit their dentist regularly. With braces, food may be caught in places that your toothbrush can’t reach. This causes bacteria to build up and can lead to cavities, gingivitis, and gum disease. Your dentist will work closely with your orthodontist to make sure that your teeth stay clean and healthy while wearing braces.

 

  1. What causes cavities?

 

Your mouth is a busy place. Bacteria – tiny colonies of living organisms are constantly on the move on your teeth, gums, lips and tongue. Having bacteria in your mouth is a normal thing. While some of the bacteria can be harmful, most are not and some are even helpful.

 

Certain types of bacteria, however, can attach themselves to hard surfaces like the enamel that covers your teeth. If they’re not removed, they multiply and grow in number until a colony forms. More bacteria of different types attach to the colony already growing on the tooth enamel. Proteins that are present in your saliva (spit) also mix in and the bacteria colony becomes a whitish film on the tooth. This film is called plaque, and it’s what causes cavities.

 

When refined carbohydrates or sugars are ingested, these bacteria present in the mouth use the sugar and convert it to acid that dissolves tooth enamel. The acid attacks start immediately after consuming sugars and last for 20-30 minutes.

 

  1. What is the best way to get my teeth whiter?

                                    

Tandarts Dental Surgery would be happy to discuss several options with you to help you with your smile. We offer teeth cleanings, in-office whitening, and take-home whitening tray kits with different whitening gel strengths.

 

  1. Will I feel any pain?


Most patients feel no discomfort during their treatment and feel surprisingly good afterwards.

 

 

 

 

  1. Will I be unconscious?


No, you will be in a relaxed state, and you will be responsive.

 

  1. Will I be monitored?


Yes, two members of our team are always with you and your vital signs are monitored during the entire visit. You are never alone.

 

  1. How can I prevent cavities?

 

Always spend two to three minutes brushing your teeth. It takes that long to get rid of the bacteria that destroy tooth enamel. Do not brush too hard. It takes very little pressure to remove bacteria and plaque. Floss at least once a day. Flossing is the only way to get bacteria from between your teeth.

 

Watch the sugar you eat. There is sugar in candy, fruits, crackers and chips. These are the foods that the bacteria in your mouth like best. Be mindful of foods like raisins and peanut butter that stick to your teeth. They can provide a constant supply for the bacteria eating into your teeth. Try to minimize the times during the day when sweet items are eaten and brush your teeth afterwards.

 

If you cannot brush after a meal, rinse your mouth with water – which can help to remove food from your teeth. Chewing sugarless gum after a meal can also help.

 

Chewing deskulates the flow of your saliva which acts as a natural plaque-fighting substance. And do not forget your regular dental visits. Good dental habits will go a long way toward a no-cavity visit.